If you did a vacation scheme with your firm, how would you rate it?

FirmScore (/100)
RPC 98.4
Mills & Reeve LLP 96.2

Skadden, Arps, Slate, Meagher & Flom (UK) LLP

95.2
Bird & Bird LLP 94.6
Farrer & Co 94.4
Forsters LLP 94.4
Osborne Clarke LLP 94.4
Burges Salmon LLP 94.3
Baker McKenzie 94.0
Cleary Gottlieb Steen & Hamilton LLP 93.5
Muckle LLP

93.3

Roythornes Solicitors 93.0
Hogan Lovells 92.2
Birketts LLP 92.1
Ashurst LLP 91.8
Debevoise & Plimpton LLP 91.3
Gateley Plc 91.2
TLT Solicitors LLP 91.2

Milbank, Tweed, Hadley & McCloy LLP

91.0

Burness Paull 91.0

What better way to decide if a law firm is right for you than undertaking a vacation scheme?

Although these placements are often rather dauntingly described as a one, two or three-week interview, there are undoubtedly numerous advantages to gaining a first-hand insight into a firm.

Some firms make a big effort to arrange a jam-packed work placement where potential recruits experience life as a trainee through undertaking engaging work alongside fun activities such as pizza-making or dinners in fancy restaurants.

These Lex 100 winners have come up trumps by wowing trainees with their vacation schemes.

Recruits ‘really enjoyed the summer scheme’ at RPC, which was a key factor in their decision to train at the firm.

Similarly, ‘the high-quality work’ on offer at Shakespeare Martineau, the ‘fantastic culture’ at Mills & Reeve and the ‘prestige’ of Skadden, Arps, Slate, Meagher & Flom became evident during the firms’ vacation schemes.

Trainees at Bird & Bird continue to cite the vacation scheme as a big draw and one recruit at Farrer & Co commented that ‘during my vacation scheme I felt the atmosphere in the office was open and personable’.

A Forsters trainee ‘felt at ease’ during their vacation scheme, whilst Osborne Clarke’s placement ‘set it apart from the rest’ and was ‘very open, honest and transparent’.

A ‘fantastic experience’ on the Burges Salmon vacation scheme was the clincher for one trainee, whilst the ‘excellent vacation scheme’ at Baker McKenzie convinced one recruit that the firm ‘would be a good place to train’.